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Using Pu-239 as a tracer for fine sediment sources in the Daly River, Northern Australia

Lal, R., Fifield, L. K., Tims, S. G., Wasson, Robert J. and Howe, David (2015). Using Pu-239 as a tracer for fine sediment sources in the Daly River, Northern Australia. In: Heavy Ion Accelerator Symposium on Fundamental and Applied Science - 2014, Canberra, ACT, 30 June - 2 July 2014.

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IRMA ID 75039815xPUB997
Author Lal, R.
Fifield, L. K.
Tims, S. G.
Wasson, Robert J.
Howe, David
Title Using Pu-239 as a tracer for fine sediment sources in the Daly River, Northern Australia
Conference Name Heavy Ion Accelerator Symposium on Fundamental and Applied Science - 2014
Conference Location Canberra, ACT
Conference Dates 30 June - 2 July 2014
Conference Publication Title Heavy Ion Accelerator Symposium on Fundamental and Applied Science - 2014 published in: EPJ Web of Conferences
Place of Publication France
Publisher E D P Sciences
Publication Year 2015
Volume Number 91 - Article No. 00006
ISSN 2100-014X   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Total Pages 7
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DIISR)
Abstract The Daly River drains a large (52500 km2) and mainly undisturbed catchment in the Australian wet–dry tropics. Clearing and cropping since 2002 have raised concerns about possible increased sediment input into the river and motivated this study of its fine sediment sources. Using 239Pu as a tracer it is shown that the fine sediments originate mainly from erosion by gullying and channel change. Although the results also indicate that the surface soil contribution to the river channel sediments from sheet erosion has increased to 5-22% for the Daly River and 7-28% for the Douglas River (a tributary of the Daly River) in 2009 vs. 3-6% for the Daly River and 4-9% for the Douglas River in 2005. This excess top soil likely originates from thecleared land adjacent to the Daly River since 2005. However, channel widening largely as a result of hydrologic change is still the dominant sediment source in this catchment.
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to published version
Link to CC Attribution 4.0 License
URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/epjconf/20159100006
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/


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