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Hypomagnesaemia and its potential impact on thiamine utilisation in patients with alcohol misuse at the Alice Springs Hospital

Dingwall, Kylie M., Delima, Jennifer F., Gent, Debra and Batey, Robert G. (2015). Hypomagnesaemia and its potential impact on thiamine utilisation in patients with alcohol misuse at the Alice Springs Hospital. Drug and Alcohol Review,34(3):323-328.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84473293xPUB130
Title Hypomagnesaemia and its potential impact on thiamine utilisation in patients with alcohol misuse at the Alice Springs Hospital
Author Dingwall, Kylie M.
Delima, Jennifer F.
Gent, Debra
Batey, Robert G.
Journal Name Drug and Alcohol Review
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 34
Issue Number 3
ISSN 0959-5236   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84928766744
Start Page 323
End Page 328
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Field of Research MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Introduction and Aims
Alcohol rapidly reduces thiamine among alcohol-dependent individuals. Poor diet and alcohol's impact on absorption, storage, activation and excretion of thiamine are thought to be the mechanisms. Previous literature identifies magnesium as an important cofactor in thiamine utilisation, which might also be compromised in alcohol dependent patients. The aim was to describe the thiamine status and clinical profile for a sample of heavy alcohol users entering the Alice Springs Hospital in the Northern Territory of Australia and to examine the relationship between thiamine deficiency, magnesium deficiency and cognitive functioning.

Design and Methods

Cross-sectional study examining thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and magnesium concentrations for a sample of 62 males and 43 females (N = 105; n = 88 Aboriginal, n = 13 non-Indigenous). Cognition was assessed using the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale.

Results

TPP concentrations were within or above the reference range. Aboriginal patients had significantly lower TPP than non-Indigenous patients. A marginally significant difference was found between individuals with thiamine supplementation recorded within the previous 20 days compared with those without. Mean serum magnesium was in the low normal range with magnesium deficiency (i.e. <0.80 mmol L−1) present in 48% of those tested. Serum magnesium (but not TPP) concentrations correlated positively with cognitive test scores.

Discussion and Conclusions

Despite increased exposure to risk factors for Wernicke Korsakoff Syndrome, no patient had TPP concentrations below the reference range. High patient readmission and aggressive thiamine treatment policies may explain this finding. However, low magnesium may be prevalent and could contribute to impaired thiamine utilisation. [Dingwall KM, Delima JF, Gent D, Batey RG.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1111/dar.12237   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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