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Prospective Study in a Porcine Model of Sarcoptes scabiei Indicates the Association of Th2 and Th17 Pathways with the Clinical Severity of Scabies

Mounsey, Kate E., Murray, Hugh C., Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle, Pasay, Cielo, Holt, Deborah C., Currie, Bart J., Walton, Shelley F. and McCarthy, James S. (2015). Prospective Study in a Porcine Model of Sarcoptes scabiei Indicates the Association of Th2 and Th17 Pathways with the Clinical Severity of Scabies. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases,9(3 - Article No. e0003498).

Document type: Journal Article
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ARC Grant No. DE120101701
IRMA ID 11381xPUB32
NHMRC Grant No. 496635
1027434
1041802
Title Prospective Study in a Porcine Model of Sarcoptes scabiei Indicates the Association of Th2 and Th17 Pathways with the Clinical Severity of Scabies
Author Mounsey, Kate E.
Murray, Hugh C.
Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle
Pasay, Cielo
Holt, Deborah C.
Currie, Bart J.
Walton, Shelley F.
McCarthy, James S.
Journal Name PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 9
Issue Number 3 - Article No. e0003498
ISSN 1935-2735   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84928805077
Total Pages 17
Place of Publication United States of America
Publisher Public Library of Science
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Background

Understanding of scabies immunopathology has been hampered by the inability to undertake longitudinal studies in humans. Pigs are a useful animal model for scabies, and show clinical and immunologic changes similar to those in humans. Crusted scabies can be readily established in pigs by treatment with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex).

Methodology/ Principal Findings

Prospective study of 24 pigs in four groups: a) Scabies+/Dex+, b) Scabies+/Dex-, c) Scabies-/Dex+ and d) Scabies-/Dex-. Clinical symptoms were monitored. Histological profiling and transcriptional analysis of skin biopsies was undertaken to compare changes in cell infiltrates and representative cytokines. A range of clinical responses to Sarcoptes scabiei were observed in Dex treated and non-immunosuppressed pigs. An association was confirmed between disease severity and transcription of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, and up-regulation of the Th17 cytokines IL-17 and IL-23 in pigs with crusted scabies. Immunohistochemistry revealed marked infiltration of lymphocytes and mast cells, and strong staining for IL-17.

Conclusions/ Significance

While an allergic Th2 type response to scabies has been previously described, these results suggest that IL-17 related pathways may also contribute to immunopathology of crusted scabies. This may lead to new strategies to protect vulnerable subjects from contracting recurrent crusted scabies.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003498   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 4.0 License
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/au


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