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'Like Drawing Into Sand': Acceptability, Feasibility, and Appropriateness of a New e-Mental Health Resource for Service Providers Working With Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

Dingwall, Kylie M., Puszka, Stephanie, Sweet, Michelle and Nagel, Tricia M. (2015). 'Like Drawing Into Sand': Acceptability, Feasibility, and Appropriateness of a New e-Mental Health Resource for Service Providers Working With Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People. Australian Psychologist,50:60-69.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 11381xPUB3
Title 'Like Drawing Into Sand': Acceptability, Feasibility, and Appropriateness of a New e-Mental Health Resource for Service Providers Working With Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People
Author Dingwall, Kylie M.
Puszka, Stephanie
Sweet, Michelle
Nagel, Tricia M.
Journal Name Australian Psychologist
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 50
ISSN 0005-0067   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84920995022
Start Page 60
End Page 69
Total Pages 10
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Cross-cultural considerations and difficulties recruiting and retaining skilled workers in rural and remote regions may contribute to poorer service use for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. However, electronic resources may provide the opportunity for remote workforces to deliver structured, evidence-based, culturally appropriate treatments with limited training burden. The aim was to develop and determine the acceptability, feasibility, and appropriateness of a new e-mental health resource (the Australian Integrated Mental Health Initiative [AIMhi] Stay Strong App) for service providers working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Northern Territory. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 service providers and managers from a range of rural and remote primary health care service settings in the Northern Territory. All participants were given the resource to trial for at least 1 month before being interviewed about perceived barriers and enablers, acceptability, and feasibility. Thematic analysis revealed support for the acceptability, feasibility, and appropriateness of the resource among service providers. Major themes identified included acceptability, building relationships, broad applicability, training recommendations, integration with existing systems, and constraints to implementation. This is one of the first studies to explore the acceptability of e-mental health approaches for Aboriginal people among the remote health workforce. It is likely that e-mental health interventions, such as the AIMhi Stay Strong App will assist services to deliver evidence-based, structured interventions to improve well-being for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ap.12100   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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