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Collaborative research partnerships inform monitoring and management of aquatic ecosystems by Indigenous rangers

Dobbs, Rebecca J., Davies, Christy L., Walker, Michelle L., Pettit, Neil E., Pusey, Bradley J., Close, Paul G., Akune, Yoshi, Walsham, Ninjana, Smith, Brendan, Wiggan, Albert, Cox, Preston, Ward, Douglas P., Tingle, Fiona, Kennett, Rod M., Jackson, Micha V. and Davies, Peter M. (2016). Collaborative research partnerships inform monitoring and management of aquatic ecosystems by Indigenous rangers. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries,26(4):711-725.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 3
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IRMA ID 81144320xPUB121
Title Collaborative research partnerships inform monitoring and management of aquatic ecosystems by Indigenous rangers
Author Dobbs, Rebecca J.
Davies, Christy L.
Walker, Michelle L.
Pettit, Neil E.
Pusey, Bradley J.
Close, Paul G.
Akune, Yoshi
Walsham, Ninjana
Smith, Brendan
Wiggan, Albert
Cox, Preston
Ward, Douglas P.
Tingle, Fiona
Kennett, Rod M.
Jackson, Micha V.
Davies, Peter M.
Journal Name Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries
Publication Date 2016
Volume Number 26
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1573-5184   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84944937434
Start Page 711
End Page 725
Total Pages 15
Place of Publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Field of Research 0704 - Fisheries Sciences
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Aquatic ecosystems are critical to the long-term viability and vibrancy of communities and economies across northern Australia. In a region that supports significant cultural and ecological water values, partnerships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous stakeholders can benefit aquatic ecosystem management. We present, as a case study from the Kimberley region of Western Australia, a collaborative research program that successfully documented Indigenous and Western Scientific knowledge of remote wetlands, using a variety of field-based activities, questionnaires, interviews and workshops. The sharing of knowledge between Indigenous and non-Indigenous research partners facilitated a comprehensive understanding of ecosystem values, threats, processes, management priorities and aspirations. These formed the basis of a management plan and monitoring tools, designed to build the capacity of an Indigenous ranger group to engage in research, monitoring and management of wetlands. The project provides a useful example of the benefits of collaborations in the context of remote-area management where local communities are responsible for environmental management and monitoring, such as is the case in northern Australia and presumably other areas of the world.
Keywords Indigenous ecological knowledge
Traditional knowledge
Wetlands
Kimberley
Indigenous wetland management
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11160-015-9401-2   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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