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Building on 'Red Dirt' Perspectives: What Counts as Important for Remote Education?

Guenther, John Ch., Disbray, Samantha and Osborne, Sam (2015). Building on 'Red Dirt' Perspectives: What Counts as Important for Remote Education?. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education,44(2):194-206.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 2
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IRMA ID 81144320xPUB125
Title Building on 'Red Dirt' Perspectives: What Counts as Important for Remote Education?
Author Guenther, John Ch.
Disbray, Samantha
Osborne, Sam
Journal Name The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 44
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1326-0111   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84946143575
Start Page 194
End Page 206
Total Pages 13
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Field of Research 1303 - Specialist Studies in Education
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract The Remote Education Systems (RES) project within the Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation (CRC-REP) has, over the last four years, gathered and analysed qualitative data directly from over 230 remote education stakeholders and from more than 700 others through surveys. The research was designed to answer four questions: (1) What is education for in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities?; (2) What defines ‘successful’ educational outcomes from the remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander standpoint?; (3) How does teaching need to change in order to achieve ‘success’ as defined by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander standpoint?; and (4) What would an effective education system in remote Australia look like? Based on this data, the paper reveals how perceptions differ for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from remote communities compared with people who come from elsewhere. The analysis points to the need for some alternative indicators of ‘success’ to match the aspirations of local people living in remote communities. It also points to the need for school and system responses that resonate with community expectations of education, and to develop narratives of aspiration and success alongside community views.

Keywords remote education systems
educational success
Indigenous education
educational policy
remote community aspirations
successful teaching in remote schools
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/jie.2015.20   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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