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Use of Traditional Indigenous Medicine and Complementary Medicine Among Indigenous Cancer Patients in Queensland, Australia

Adams, Jonathan, Valery, Patricia C., Sibbritt, Davd, Bernardes, Christina M., Broom, Alex and Garvey, Gail (2015). Use of Traditional Indigenous Medicine and Complementary Medicine Among Indigenous Cancer Patients in Queensland, Australia. Integrative Cancer Therapies,14(4):359-365.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 11
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IRMA ID 11381xPUB106
Title Use of Traditional Indigenous Medicine and Complementary Medicine Among Indigenous Cancer Patients in Queensland, Australia
Author Adams, Jonathan
Valery, Patricia C.
Sibbritt, Davd
Bernardes, Christina M.
Broom, Alex
Garvey, Gail
Journal Name Integrative Cancer Therapies
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 14
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1552-695X   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84936937520
Start Page 359
End Page 365
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication United States
Publisher Sage Publications, Inc.
Field of Research MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Background. The cancer toll on Indigenous Australians is alarming with overall cancer incidence and mortality rates higher and the 5-year survival rate lower for Indigenous Australians compared with non-Indigenous Australians. Meanwhile, a range of approaches to health and illness—including both complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and traditional Indigenous medicine (TM)—are used by cancer patients. Little work has focused on Indigenous cancer patients with regard to CAM/TM use. This article reports findings from the first examination of the prevalence and profile of TM/CAM use and users among Indigenous Australians with cancer.

Methods
. A structured questionnaire was administered via face-to-face interviews to 248 Indigenous Australian cancer patients diagnosed with a range of cancer types. All received treatment and were recruited from 1 of 4 large hospitals located in Queensland, Australia.

Results. A substantial percentage (18.7%) of Indigenous cancer patients use at least one TM/CAM for support with their care, including traditional Indigenous therapy use (2.8%), visiting a traditional Indigenous practitioner (2.8%), CAM use (10.7%), visiting a CAM practitioner (2.4%), and attending relaxation/meditation classes (4.0%). Having a higher level of educational attainment was positively associated with CAM practitioner consultations (P = .015). Women with breast cancer were more likely to attend relaxation/meditation classes (P = .019). Men with genital organ cancer were more likely to use traditional Indigenous therapies (P = .017) and/or CAM (P = .002).

Conclusion. A substantial percentage of Indigenous Australians reported using TM/CAM for their cancer care, and there is a need to expand examination of this area of health care using large-scale studies focusing on in-depth specific cancer(s).
Keywords Indigenous
cancer
traditional medicine
complementary and alternative medicine
traditional Indigenous practitioner
relaxation/meditation classes
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534735415583555   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Jul 2016, 12:47:22 CST