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Ten years of trauma in the 'top end' of the Northern Territory, Australia: A retrospective analysis

Gowing, Christopher J., McDermott, Kathleen M., Ward, Linda M. and Martin, Bronte L. (2015). Ten years of trauma in the 'top end' of the Northern Territory, Australia: A retrospective analysis. International Emergency Nursing,23(1):17-21.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84473306xPUB82
Title Ten years of trauma in the 'top end' of the Northern Territory, Australia: A retrospective analysis
Author Gowing, Christopher J.
McDermott, Kathleen M.
Ward, Linda M.
Martin, Bronte L.
Journal Name International Emergency Nursing
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 23
Issue Number 1
ISSN 1755-599X   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84920604737
Start Page 17
End Page 21
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier Ltd.
Field of Research MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Aim
To examine characteristics of traumatic injury in adults and children at the Royal Darwin Hospital (RDH) over a 10 year period.

Method

A retrospective review of the RDH Trauma Registry data from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2012, with analysis of patient demographics, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and outcome.

Participants

Two thousand seven hundred twenty-five patients with an ISS greater than or equal to 9 and met all other study inclusion criteria.

Results

Motor vehicle crashes, assaults and falls consistently remained the three most common mechanisms of injury throughout the 10 year period. Indigenous admissions showed a significant downward trend (p = 0.009). Upward trends were noted in presentations from patients aged greater than 44 (p = 0.002), all-terrain vehicle accidents (p < 0.001), and hangings (p = 0.003). No other trends were noted to significant at a p < 0.05 level. Admitted Indigenous patients were significantly more likely to be present due to assault (p < 0.001) and female patients were more likely to present due to assault, falls and motor vehicle crashes (p < 0.01) than their counterparts.

Conclusion

Presentations for traumatic injury to Royal Darwin Hospital have remained in the most part, consistently stable for the period of 2003–2012. Though there were some increases/decreases in regard to specific demographics and mechanisms, few were found to be statistically significant at a p < 0.05 level.
Keywords Trauma
Australia
Northern Territory
Top end
Royal Darwin Hospital
Mechanism of injury
ISS
Indigenous
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ienj.2014.09.006   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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