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Human effects on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems: Integrating scientific approaches to support management and mitigation

Crook, David A., Lowe, Winsor H., Allendorf, Frederick W., Eros, Tibor, Finn, Debra S., Gillanders, Bronwyn M., Hadwen, Wade L., Harrod, Chris, Hermoso, Virgilio, Jennings, Simon, Kilada, Raouf W., Nagelkerken, Ivan, Hansen, Michael M., Page, Timothy J., Riginos, Cynthia, Fry, Brian and Hughes, Jane M. (2015). Human effects on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems: Integrating scientific approaches to support management and mitigation. Science of the Total Environment,534(November):52-64.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 24
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IRMA ID 84376995xPUB208
Title Human effects on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems: Integrating scientific approaches to support management and mitigation
Author Crook, David A.
Lowe, Winsor H.
Allendorf, Frederick W.
Eros, Tibor
Finn, Debra S.
Gillanders, Bronwyn M.
Hadwen, Wade L.
Harrod, Chris
Hermoso, Virgilio
Jennings, Simon
Kilada, Raouf W.
Nagelkerken, Ivan
Hansen, Michael M.
Page, Timothy J.
Riginos, Cynthia
Fry, Brian
Hughes, Jane M.
Journal Name Science of the Total Environment
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 534
Issue Number November
ISSN 0048-9697   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84940438399
Start Page 52
End Page 64
Total Pages 13
Place of Publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Field of Research ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Understanding the drivers and implications of anthropogenic disturbance of ecological connectivity is a key concern for the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem processes. Here, we review human activities that affect the movements and dispersal of aquatic organisms, including damming of rivers, river regulation, habitat loss and alteration, human-assisted dispersal of organisms and climate change. Using a series of case studies, we show that the insight needed to understand the nature and implications of connectivity, and to underpin conservation and management, is best achieved via data synthesis from multiple analytical approaches. We identify four key knowledge requirements for progressing our understanding of the effects of anthropogenic impacts on ecological connectivity: autecology; population structure; movement characteristics; and environmental tolerance/phenotypic plasticity. Structuring empirical research around these four broad data requirements, and using this information to parameterise appropriate models and develop management approaches, will allow for mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on ecological connectivity in aquatic ecosystems.
Keywords Fragmentation
Dispersal
Migration
Meta-population
Source-sink
Climate change
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.04.034   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Jul 2016, 12:56:06 CST