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Monitoring the Distribution and Dynamics of an Invasive Grass in Tropical Savanna Using Airborne LiDAR

Levick, Shaun R., Setterfield, Samantha A., Rossiter-Rachor, Natalie A., Hutley, Lindsay B., McMaster, Damien and Hacker, Jorg M. (2015). Monitoring the Distribution and Dynamics of an Invasive Grass in Tropical Savanna Using Airborne LiDAR. Remote Sensing,7(5):5117-5132.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84376995xPUB209
Title Monitoring the Distribution and Dynamics of an Invasive Grass in Tropical Savanna Using Airborne LiDAR
Author Levick, Shaun R.
Setterfield, Samantha A.
Rossiter-Rachor, Natalie A.
Hutley, Lindsay B.
McMaster, Damien
Hacker, Jorg M.
Journal Name Remote Sensing
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 7
Issue Number 5
ISSN 2072-4292   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84930035735
Start Page 5117
End Page 5132
Total Pages 16
Place of Publication Switzerland
Publisher M D P I AG
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract The spread of an alien invasive grass (gamba grass—Andropogon gayanus) in the tropical savannas of Northern Australia is a major threat to habitat quality and biodiversity in the region, primarily through its influence on fire intensity. Effective control and eradication of this invader requires better insight into its spatial distribution and rate of spread to inform management actions. We used full-waveform airborne LiDAR to map areas of known A. gayanus invasion in the Batchelor region of the Northern Territory, Australia. Our stratified sampling campaign included wooded savanna areas with differing degrees of A. gayanus invasion and adjacent areas of native grass and woody tree mixtures. We used height and spatial contiguity based metrics to classify returns from A. gayanus and developed spatial representations of A. gayanus occurrence (1 m resolution) and canopy cover (10 m resolution). The cover classification proved robust against two independent field-based investigations at 500 m2 (R2 = 0.87, RMSE = 12.53) and 100 m2 (R2 = 0.79, RMSE = 14.13) scale. Our mapping results provide a solid benchmark for evaluating the rate and pattern of A. gayanus spread from future LiDAR campaigns. In addition, this high-resolution mapping can be used to inform satellite image analysis for the evaluation of A. gayanus invasion over broader regional scales. Our research highlights the huge potential that airborne LiDAR holds for facilitating the monitoring and management of savanna habitat condition.
Keywords Alien plant
Gamba grass
Invasion
LiDAR
Weed mapping
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/rs70505117   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 4.0 License
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/au


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