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Future sea changes: Indigenous women's preferences for adaptation to climate change on South Goulburn Island, Northern Territory (Australia)

Petheram, Lisa, Stacey, Natasha E. and Fleming, Ann E. (2015). Future sea changes: Indigenous women's preferences for adaptation to climate change on South Goulburn Island, Northern Territory (Australia). Climate and Development,7(4):339-352.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84376995xPUB87
Title Future sea changes: Indigenous women's preferences for adaptation to climate change on South Goulburn Island, Northern Territory (Australia)
Author Petheram, Lisa
Stacey, Natasha E.
Fleming, Ann E.
Journal Name Climate and Development
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 7
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1756-5529   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84938552453
Start Page 339
End Page 352
Total Pages 14
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Earthscan Ltd.
Field of Research ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Research on South Goulburn Island aimed to improve understanding of Indigenous perspectives on climate change and options for adaptation within the scope of the local coastal, marine environment and resources utilized by the community. We also aimed to promote awareness among community members of western scientific concepts of climate change. Workshops and interviews with participants emphasized the use of participatory, visual techniques to encourage discussion and visioning of the future. Participants indicated very limited understanding of western concepts and English language terms associated with climate change and why change was occurring. However, in deeper conversations, many reported observing unusual patterns of environmental change they could not explain by other means. These observations, combined with changes in customary practices and loss of local knowledge in recent years, worried participants, particularly the elderly. The idea that climate change was resulting from human impacts on the environment was an easy concept for most participants to grasp. The demonstrated worldviews of participants was dominated by social and cultural links to the past and present, but had weaker links to western concepts of ‘the future’. Thus, discussions around planning adaptation did not generally fit easily into peoples' framings of their worlds. People's preferences for adaptation included building general community capacity, drawing from customary knowledge, being more involved in decision-making and learning more about scientific knowledge on climate change. Enabling collection of plant and animal foods and associated interaction with the landscape was also considered important for improving community independence, resilience and well-being for adaptation.
Keywords Indigenous
limate change
adaptation
coastal
women
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17565529.2014.951019   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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