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Spatial and temporal patterns of harvesting of the Vulnerable pig-nosed turtle Carettochelys insculpta in the Kikori region, Papua New Guinea

Eisemberg, Carla C., Rose, Mark, Yaru, Benedict and Georges, Arthur (2015). Spatial and temporal patterns of harvesting of the Vulnerable pig-nosed turtle Carettochelys insculpta in the Kikori region, Papua New Guinea. Oryx,49(4):659-668.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 84376995xPUB92
Title Spatial and temporal patterns of harvesting of the Vulnerable pig-nosed turtle Carettochelys insculpta in the Kikori region, Papua New Guinea
Author Eisemberg, Carla C.
Rose, Mark
Yaru, Benedict
Georges, Arthur
Journal Name Oryx
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 49
Issue Number 4
ISSN 0030-6053   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84940947399
Start Page 659
End Page 668
Total Pages 10
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Field of Research ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Management of wildlife use by communities living a partially traditional lifestyle is usually more successful when the interactions between those communities and the environment are well understood. We mapped the harvest areas for the Vulnerable pig-nosed turtle Carettochelys insculpta for six language-groups in the Kikori region of Papua New Guinea and compared harvest parameters between different areas and language-groups and, when possible, between 1980–1982 and 2007–2009. Spatially, the main influence on harvest method was a tribe's location relative to the turtle's distribution. No small juveniles (< 20 cm straight-line carapace length) were found outside the Kikori delta, which is probably the species’ feeding grounds. In contrast, nesting females were captured only in upstream and coastal sandbank areas. Temporally there were distinct differences in harvesting parameters between tribes, which may be explained by differential employment opportunities. To halt the decline of pig-nosed turtles in the Kikori region we recommend the establishment of beach and feeding-ground protection initiatives, together with monitoring of the turtle population and harvest. Concomitantly, trips specifically targeted at harvesting the turtles, which account for 81% of the animals captured, need to be restricted. These initiatives should include all six language-groups and take into account their specific harvesting patterns.
Keywords Consumption trend
fishing technology
harvest methods
language-groups
pig-nosed turtle
Papua New Guinea
sex ratio
wildlife management
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0030605313001646   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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