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The Positive Emotions that Facilitate the Fulfillment of Needs May Not Be Positive Emotions At All: The Role of Ambivalence

Moss, Simon A. and Wilson, Samuel G. (2015). The Positive Emotions that Facilitate the Fulfillment of Needs May Not Be Positive Emotions At All: The Role of Ambivalence. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing,11(1):40-50.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 75039815xPUB708
Title The Positive Emotions that Facilitate the Fulfillment of Needs May Not Be Positive Emotions At All: The Role of Ambivalence
Author Moss, Simon A.
Wilson, Samuel G.
Journal Name Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 11
Issue Number 1
ISSN 1550-8307   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84920592639
Start Page 40
End Page 50
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication United States of America
Publisher Elsevier Inc.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Rationale: According to some scholars, if individuals experience over three times as many positive emotions as negative emotions, they are more likely to thrive. We contend, however, that perhaps positive and negative emotions that overlap in time are likely to enhance wellbeing. Specifically, if positive and negative emotions are experienced simultaneously rather than separately-called ambivalent emotions-the fundamental needs of individuals are fulfilled more frequently.

Evidence: Considerable evidence supports this perspective. First, many emotions that enhance wellbeing, although classified as positive, also coincide with negative feelings. Second, ambivalent emotions, rather than positive or negative emotions separately, facilitate creativity and resilience. Third, ambivalent emotions activate distinct cognitive systems that enable individuals to form attainable goals, refine their skills, and enhance their relationships.
Keywords Ambivalent emotions
Autonomy
Competence
Positive emotions
Relationships
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2014.10.006   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Jul 2016, 13:03:02 CST