Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Supporting aboriginal knowledge and practice in health care: Lessons from a qualitative evaluation of the strong women, strong babies, strong culture program

Lowell, Anne, Kildea, Sue V., Liddle, Marlene, Cox, Barbara and Paterson, Barbara (2015). Supporting aboriginal knowledge and practice in health care: Lessons from a qualitative evaluation of the strong women, strong babies, strong culture program. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth,15(Article No. 19).

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 1
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your CDU eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Download this reading Lowell_59509.pdf Published version application/pdf 436.73KB 26
Reading the attached file works best in Firefox, Chrome and IE 9 or later.

IRMA ID 75039815xPUB804
Title Supporting aboriginal knowledge and practice in health care: Lessons from a qualitative evaluation of the strong women, strong babies, strong culture program
Author Lowell, Anne
Kildea, Sue V.
Liddle, Marlene
Cox, Barbara
Paterson, Barbara
Journal Name BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Publication Date 2015
Volume Number 15
Issue Number Article No. 19
ISSN 1471-2393   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-84924109235
Total Pages 12
Place of Publication Untied Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DIISR)
Abstract Background
The Strong Women, Strong Babies, Strong Culture Program (the Program) evolved from a recognition of the value of Aboriginal knowledge and practice in promoting maternal and child health (MCH) in remote communities of the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia. Commencing in 1993 it continues to operate today. In 2008, the NT Department of Health commissioned an evaluation to identify enabling factors and barriers to successful implementation of the Program, and to identify potential pathways for future development. In this paper we focus on the evaluation findings related specifically to the role of Aborignal cultural knowledge and practice within the Program.

Methods
A qualitative evaluation utilised purposive sampling to maximise diversity in program history and Aboriginal culture. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 76 participants were recorded in their preferred language with a registered Interpreter when required. Thematic analysis of data was verified or modified through further discussions with participants and members of the evaluation team.

Results
Although the importance of Aboriginal knowledge and practice as a fundamental component of the Program is widely acknowledged, there has been considerable variation across time and location in the extent to which these cultural dimensions have been included in practice. Factors contributing to this variation are complex and relate to a number of broad themes including: location of control over Program activities; recognition and respect for Aboriginal knowledge and practice as a legitimate component of health care; working in partnership; communication within and beyond the Program; access to transport and working space; and governance and organisational support.

Conclusions
We suggest that inclusion of Aboriginal knowledge and practice as a fundamental component of the Program is key to its survival over more than twenty years despite serious challenges. Respect for the legitimacy of Aboriginal knowledge and practice within health care, a high level of community participation and control supported through effective governance and sufficient organisational commitment as well as competence in intercultural collaborative practice of health staff are critical requirements for realising the potential for cultural knowledge and practice to improve Aboriginal health outcomes.


Keywords Maternal and child health
Indigenous health
Aboriginal culture
Intercultural health care
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12884-015-0433-3   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Description for Link Link to CC Attribution 4.0 License
URL https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/au


© copyright

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in CDU eSpace. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact digitisation@cdu.edu.au.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 52 Abstract Views, 26 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 26 Jul 2016, 13:04:07 CST