Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Should Australia Adopt the Groningen Protocol? : Considering the effects of legalising assisted dying on persons with disabilities who cannot consent

Morris, Sarah (2015). Should Australia Adopt the Groningen Protocol? : Considering the effects of legalising assisted dying on persons with disabilities who cannot consent. : .

Document type: Research Report
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your CDU eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Download this reading Morris_59738.pdf Published version application/pdf 663.89KB 73
Reading the attached file works best in Firefox, Chrome and IE 9 or later.

Author Morris, Sarah
Title of Report Should Australia Adopt the Groningen Protocol? : Considering the effects of legalising assisted dying on persons with disabilities who cannot consent
Publication Date 2015
Total Pages 50
Field of Research LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES
Abstract With recent developments creating physician assisted suicide lawful around the world and politician’s Bills being introduced in Australia and the United Kingdom, it is not surprising the debate on euthanasia and assisted suicide is being constantly revived. Nancy Fitzmaurice was a 12 year-old child born with hydrocephalus, meningitis and septicaemia and was blind, could not walk, talk, eat or drink and was in need of constant care. In late 2014 her mother, Charlotte Fitzmaurice, was allowed to euthanise her on the grounds she was in too much pain and was suffering. This was despite being given morphine and ketamine to assist with the pain while she was being treated at London’s Great Ormand Street Hospital. Charlotte spoke of the ‘light from her [daughter’s] eyes’ leaving and being ‘replaced with fear and a longing to be at peace.’ It was the first decision involving a child who was still breathing by themselves and not on life support being allowed to die. It bears the question of whether the decision to terminate the life of a disabled person should be that of their loved ones and doctors, the courts or a combination of all. The underlying issue lies with understanding when a person has capacity to make the decision for
Additional Notes Bachelor of Laws Honours Research Paper - Unit LWC304


© copyright

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in CDU eSpace. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact digitisation@cdu.edu.au.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 62 Abstract Views, 73 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 05 Oct 2016, 09:23:19 CST by Jessie Ng