Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Impacts of Service and Infrastructure Provision on Indigenous Temporary Mobility in the Northern Territory of Australia: Insights from the 2011 Census

Zander, Kerstin K., Taylor, Andrew and Carson, Dean B. (2014). Impacts of Service and Infrastructure Provision on Indigenous Temporary Mobility in the Northern Territory of Australia: Insights from the 2011 Census. Population, Space and Place,22(1):99-116.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 3
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your CDU eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Download this reading Zander_59791.pdf Accepted version application/pdf 590.64KB 3
Reading the attached file works best in Firefox, Chrome and IE 9 or later.

Title Impacts of Service and Infrastructure Provision on Indigenous Temporary Mobility in the Northern Territory of Australia: Insights from the 2011 Census
Author Zander, Kerstin K.
Taylor, Andrew
Carson, Dean B.
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Publication Date 2014
Volume Number 22
Issue Number 1
ISSN 1544-8444   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 99
End Page 116
Total Pages 18
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Field of Research 370500 Demography
Abstract Indigenous people comprise a significant proportion of the population living in remote parts of Australia, particularly in the north. A growing body of literature has documented high mobility between remote Indigenous settlements, service towns and cities. The extent and nature of this mobility is thought to be driven, at least partly, by the types of services and infrastructure available in communities. Understanding to what extent these service and infrastructure provisions drive people's mobility and the type of people who move is essential for creating policy for remote communities and making investment decisions. We use 2011 census data to examine this issue for the Northern Territory, the Australian jurisdiction with the highest Indigenous composition in its remote population, by constructing generalised linear mixed models comparing Indigenous people's actual locations on census night with their stated usual place of residence. We found that individual characteristics (gender and age) had high impacts on individuals being at home or away on census night and that good health care provision, government subsidised community jobs and Internet access are associated with higher levels of absences from home. Meanwhile, those living in communities that had recently received new houses were less likely to be away on census night. The results can contribute to the efficiency of service provision and to understanding the dynamics of Indigenous mobility. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Keywords Housing
Indigenous mobility
Internet access
Northern Territory
Remote Populations
Multilevel modelling
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/psp.1871   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


© copyright

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in CDU eSpace. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact digitisation@cdu.edu.au.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 10 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 31 Oct 2016, 15:24:20 CST by Marion Farram