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ICT as a Catalyst for Innovation Diffusion

Dalrymple, John, O'Mahony, Barry, Levin, Elizabeth and Greenland, Steven J. (2015). ICT as a Catalyst for Innovation Diffusion. In: Andreopoulou, Zacharoula and Bochtis, Dionysis HAICTA 2015: 7th International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies in Agriculture, Food and Environment, Kavala, Greece, 17-20 September 2015.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Dalrymple, John
O'Mahony, Barry
Levin, Elizabeth
Greenland, Steven J.
Title ICT as a Catalyst for Innovation Diffusion
Conference Name HAICTA 2015: 7th International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies in Agriculture, Food and Environment
Conference Location Kavala, Greece
Conference Dates 17-20 September 2015
Conference Publication Title Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies in Agriculture, Food and Environment
Editor Andreopoulou, Zacharoula
Bochtis, Dionysis
Place of Publication Greece
Publisher Hellenic Association for Information and Communication Technologies in Agriculture, Food and Environment (HAICTA)
Publication Year 2015
Volume Number 1498
ISSN 1613-0073   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 991
End Page 996
Total Pages 6
Abstract The availability of water is a global issue which is predicted to become more pronounced in the future. As a large and relatively dry continent Australia is presented with a series of challenges within the agriculture sector. As a result, the adoption of appropriate, efficient and effective irrigation systems is an important element for future sustainability. In various Australian growing regions different modes and types of irrigation are utilized. However, local norms rather than on the basis of effective water management.
Consequently, there is a socio-psychological element in the adoption of new or alternative systems. This study reports on a project that identifies how the introduction of technology within a variety of irrigation systems types has improved water efficiency, reduced wastage and improved product adoption. In particular the study discusses how technology has improved the use of flood and micro irrigation systems as well as more recent developments in satellite assisted irrigation. The findings of the study suggest that the
enhancement of existing irrigation systems through the addition of information communications technology can overcome some traditional barriers by adding specific features that are attractive to growers.

Session 14: Smart Regional Development
Keyword Irrigation
Extension workers
Innovation diffusion
Water management
Additional Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication. The person who associated a work with this deed has dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law
Description for Link Link to conference paper
Link to conference proceedings
Link to CC Attribution CC0 1.0 Universal
URL http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1498/HAICTA_2015_paper108.pdf
http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1498/
https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/


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