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Population biology of southern calamary, Sepioteuthis Australis, in Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia

Triantafillos, Lianos. (2002). Population biology of southern calamary, Sepioteuthis Australis, in Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia. PhD Thesis, Northern Territory University.

Document type: Thesis
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Author Triantafillos, Lianos.
Title Population biology of southern calamary, Sepioteuthis Australis, in Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia
Institution Northern Territory University
Publication Date 2002
Thesis Type PhD
Subjects 0607 - Plant Biology
0704 - Fisheries Sciences
Abstract The primary objective of this thesis was to better understand the population biology and fishery of southern calamary, Sepioteuthis australis, in Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia, which accounts for over 40% of the total reported Australian catch, to facilitate management of this important natural resource. Towards this end, population structure was determined across the species range, and patterns of distribution, abundance, growth, reproductive biology and recruitment were described at several localities within Gulf St. Vincent. Three genetic types were found across southern Australasia, comprising two parental taxa that seemed to mate at random where they co-existed to form infertile hybrids. In Gulf St. Vincent, there was one genetic type with no evidence of population substructuring. This meant that the subsequent biological studies were focussed on a single stock. Southern calamary were ubiquitous throughout Gulf St. Vincent, but were unevenly dispersed with respect to size, age and sexual maturity. Newly-hatched individuals and mature adults dominated waters of


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