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A study of home literacy practices in two indigenous families and a comparsion with school based literacy practices

Mannion, Kathryn (2007). A study of home literacy practices in two indigenous families and a comparsion with school based literacy practices. PhD Thesis, Charles Darwin University.

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Author Mannion, Kathryn
Title A study of home literacy practices in two indigenous families and a comparsion with school based literacy practices
Institution Charles Darwin University
Publication Date 2007
Thesis Type PhD
Subjects 2005 - Literary Studies
Abstract This thesis documents the home literacy practices of two Indigenous families and examines the attitudes of Indigenous students and teachers and non-Indigenous teachers with regard to literacy and learning. The paper reveals the rich and diverse literacy practices in the homes of Indigenous families and the situatedness of learning in an intercultural context. Persistent questions are raised about the compatibility of home literacy practices and those of schools. Despite a succession of educational programs and policies designed to improve educational outcomes for Indigenous students, the thesis demonstrates the continuing ignorance about what Indigenous children can achieve and reveals the racialised practices of Western schools who completely discount Indigenous ways of knowing. Consistent with an intercultural perspective, hybrid practices are evident as Indigenous students’ home and school worlds collide. Apprenticeship style learning is revealed as an enduring framework in which family is considered critical and home/school partnerships are therefore considered as vital to academic success for students. Identity is seen to be interwoven with literacy and with the engagement of media and popular culture. This thesis draws important implications for how teachers might engage students more effectively in classrooms in order to improve educational outcomes.


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