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The globalization of the Didjeridu and the implications for small scale community based producers in remote northern Australia

Forner, J (2006). The globalization of the Didjeridu and the implications for small scale community based producers in remote northern Australia. In: Second International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, Hanoi and Ha Long Bay, Vietnam, 9-12 January 2006.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Forner, J
Title The globalization of the Didjeridu and the implications for small scale community based producers in remote northern Australia
Conference Name Second International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability
Conference Location Hanoi and Ha Long Bay, Vietnam
Conference Dates 9-12 January 2006
Publication Year 2006
HERDC Category E2 - Conference Publication - Full written paper, non refereed proceedings (internal)
Abstract The didjeridu is a wind instrument which is traditionally made from hollowed Eucalyptus trees and used in various ceremonial situations Aboriginal people in Northern Australia. Today the didjeridu has become a globally recognized symbol of Australianna and is produced for personal use and sale by various groups of people including Aboriginal people in Central and Southern Australia and non-Aboriginal people within Australia and around the world. The globalization of the instrument has had many and varied effects on the Aboriginal people from which the instrument originated. On one hand it has allowed these economically and socially disadvantaged communities to supplement income and on the other they have seen their cultural and intellectual property exploited and their physical property stolen (poaching of tress from Aboriginal land). In this paper it is proposed that an economically viable model for a remote community based didjeridu industry, which maintains environmental and cultural integrity and improves social conditions, is possible. This is demonstrated through an analysis of existing production methods, costs and sales strategies. Target customer groups are identified through the examination of market research conducted in the Northern Territory, Australia and environmental sustainability is assessed by summarising ecological response of harvests. Finally recommendations are made for pursuit of a sustainably managed didjeridu industry in northern Australia.
 
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