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An analysis on free convection flow in building ventilation

Soh, WK and Kelly, J (2008). An analysis on free convection flow in building ventilation. In: Prasad, D and Morrison, G 3rd International Solar Energy Society Conference and 46th Australian New Zealand Energy Society Conference, Sydney, 25-28 November, 2008.

Document type: Conference Paper

IRMA ID 83393865xPUB41
Author Soh, WK
Kelly, J
Title An analysis on free convection flow in building ventilation
Conference Name 3rd International Solar Energy Society Conference and 46th Australian New Zealand Energy Society Conference
Conference Location Sydney
Conference Dates 25-28 November, 2008
Conference Publication Title Proceedings of the 3rd International Solar Energy Society Conference 2008 & 46th Australian New Zealand Energy Society Conference
Editor Prasad, D
Morrison, G
Place of Publication Sydney
Publisher Australian New Zealand Energy Society
Publication Year 2008
ISBN 978-0-646-50593-0   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1
End Page 9
Total Pages 9
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract Passive ventilation of buildings is the process whereby air is supplied and removed through natural means. An intensified interest in sustainable design has led to increased demand for passive ventilation methods to be used to heat or cool buildings. A natural example of passive ventilation is a termite hill. Air enters through ventilation pores at the bottom of the hill, and as it is heated, it rises and exits through pores located at the top. This principle has been modelled in solar chimneys where the inside air is heated to such an extent that it flows fast enough to drive turbines for power generation. This paper presents a study on vertical free convection driven by solar heating. The system can be incorporated into tropical housing design. Governing equations were derived to describe the flow of air through vertical shafts due to solar radiation. The analysis of the steady state condition led to solutions that provide data for evaluating various air flow configurations. The boundary conditions chosen allowed for the exploration of design parameters for optimal ventilation. Possible designs for solar ventilation were developed using these parameters. The feasibility of these designs was studied with a view to incorporate them into tropical housing design. These designs yielded satisfactory results such that cooling and air exchange was achieved at acceptable levels for human comfort.
 
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