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The dynamic nature of group A streptococcal epidemiology in tropical communities with high rates of rheumatic heart disease

McDonald, Malcolm I., Towers, Rebecca J., Andrews, Ross M., Benger, Norma, Fagan, Peter K., Currie, Bart J. and Carapetis, Jonathan R. (2008). The dynamic nature of group A streptococcal epidemiology in tropical communities with high rates of rheumatic heart disease. Epidemiology and Infection,136(4):529-539.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 10452xPUB29
Title The dynamic nature of group A streptococcal epidemiology in tropical communities with high rates of rheumatic heart disease
Author McDonald, Malcolm I.
Towers, Rebecca J.
Andrews, Ross M.
Benger, Norma
Fagan, Peter K.
Currie, Bart J.
Carapetis, Jonathan R.
Journal Name Epidemiology and Infection
Publication Date 2008
Volume Number 136
Issue Number 4
ISSN 0950-2688   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 529
End Page 539
Total Pages 11
Place of Publication Cambridge, U.K
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Field of Research 0605 - Microbiology
0799 - Other Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
1107 - Immunology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Prospective surveillance was conducted in three remote Aboriginal communities with high rates of rheumatic heart disease in order to investigate the epidemiology of group A β-haemolytic streptococci (GAS). At each household visit, participants were asked about sore throat. Swabs were taken from all throats and any skin sores. GAS isolates were emm sequence and pattern-typed using standard laboratory methods. There were 531 household visits; 43 different emm types and subtypes (emmST) were recovered. Four epidemiological patterns were observed. Multiple emmST were present in the population at any one time and household acquisition rates were high. Household acquisition was most commonly via 5- to 9-year-olds. Following acquisition, there was a 1 in 5 chance of secondary detection in the household. Throat detection of emmST was brief, usually <2 months. The epidemiology of GAS in these remote Aboriginal communities is a highly dynamic process characterized by emmST diversity and turnover.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268807008655   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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