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Guarding against oversimplifying the fundamental drivers of southern elephant seal population dynamics

McMahon, Clive R., Field, Iain C., Hindell, Mark A., DeLittle, Siobhan C. and Bradshaw, Corey J. A. (2008). Guarding against oversimplifying the fundamental drivers of southern elephant seal population dynamics. Journal of Biogeography,35(9):1738-1740.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations

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IRMA ID 79264438xPUB33
Title Guarding against oversimplifying the fundamental drivers of southern elephant seal population dynamics
Author McMahon, Clive R.
Field, Iain C.
Hindell, Mark A.
DeLittle, Siobhan C.
Bradshaw, Corey J. A.
Journal Name Journal of Biogeography
Publication Date 2008
Volume Number 35
Issue Number 9
ISSN 0305-0270   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-49549117343
Start Page 1738
End Page 1740
Total Pages 3
Place of Publication UK
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Field of Research 0403 - Geology
0406 - Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Recently, Vergani et al. (2008) examined the climatic drivers of population dynamics (weaning mass) and foraging performance (diet variation) from southern elephant seals, Mirounga leonina, in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. The principal conclusion was that elephant seal weaning masses were greater in La Nina years, when higher ocean temperatures persisted in areas where most seals from the study population at King George Island forage. The authors infer that these conditions lead to improved prey quality and quantity; however, many of the questions and hypotheses they posed have already been addressed elsewhere in the Southern Ocean. We argue that substantial speculation and uncertainty could have been avoided by the authors had they consulted and examined this considerable available literature that confirms (and in some cases, fails to support) many of their conclusions. Such a spatially limited focus in biogeography increases the risk of making important errors of interpretation.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2008.01938.x   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Tue, 05 May 2009, 13:04:56 CST by Sarena Wegener