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Body temperature and resistance to evaporative water loss in tropical Australian frogs

Tracy, Christopher R., Christian, Keith A., Betts, Gregory and Tracy, C. Richard (2008). Body temperature and resistance to evaporative water loss in tropical Australian frogs. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology,150(2):102-108.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 78672763xPUB24
Title Body temperature and resistance to evaporative water loss in tropical Australian frogs
Author Tracy, Christopher R.
Christian, Keith A.
Betts, Gregory
Tracy, C. Richard
Journal Name Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Publication Date 2008
Volume Number 150
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1531-4332   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-44849136497
Start Page 102
End Page 108
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier Science
Field of Research 1601 - Anthropology
1606 - Political Science
1116 - Medical Physiology
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Although the skin of most amphibians measured to date offers no resistance to evaporative water loss (EWL), some species, primarily arboreal frogs, produce skin secretions that increase resistance to EWL. At high air temperatures, it may be advantageous for amphibians to increase EWL as a means to decrease body temperature. In Australian hylid frogs, most species do not decrease their resistance at high air temperature, but some species with moderate resistance (at moderate air temperatures) gradually decrease resistance with increasing air temperature, and some species with high resistance (at moderate air temperatures) abruptly decrease resistance at high air temperatures. Lower skin resistance at high air temperatures decreases the time to desiccation, but the lower body temperatures allow the species to avoid their critical thermal maximum (CTMax) body temperatures. The body temperatures of species with low to moderate resistances to EWL that do not adjust resistance at high air temperatures do not warm to their CTMax, although for some species, this is because they have high CTMax values. As has been reported previously for resistance to EWL generally, the response pattern of change of EWL at high air temperatures has apparently evolved independently among Australian hylids. The mechanisms involved in causing resistance and changes in resistance are unknown.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2006.04.031   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Fri, 08 May 2009, 10:32:38 CST by Sarena Wegener