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Community processes in development and implementation of practices for the management of plant pests and diseases: A discussion paper

Myers, Bronwyn A. (2008). Community processes in development and implementation of practices for the management of plant pests and diseases: A discussion paper. Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts,2008(2):100-117.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 81108709xPUB1
Title Community processes in development and implementation of practices for the management of plant pests and diseases: A discussion paper
Author Myers, Bronwyn A.
Journal Name Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts
Publication Date 2008
Volume Number 2008
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1329-1440   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 100
End Page 117
Total Pages 18
Place of Publication Darwin, NT, Australia
Publisher Social Partnerships in Learning Research Consortium - Learning Research Group, Charles Darwin University, Darwin
Field of Research 1301 - Education Systems
1303 - Specialist Studies in Education
1399 - Other Education
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract A range of community processes contribute to the development and implementation of management practices of plant pests and diseases. The effectiveness of these processes is greater in communities with high social capital, including strong cooperative relationships within the community, and between the community and external agencies. Historically, farmers (including subsistence farmers, farmers of broadacre crops, and pastoralists) have been the producers of this type of knowledge, empowered with dignity and confidence to experiment with farming practices. Developments in the past century, particularly the Green Revolution, have seen technological interventions imposed on farmers. In relation to the control of pests, and diseases, applications of synthetic organochemicals were advocated for “revolutionary” improvements to yields in broadacre crops. The limitations and harmful environmental impacts of this approach have subsequently led to a range of “evolutionary” changes in processes for research into pest and disease management practices. There has been growing recognition of the value of farmer participation in research into pest management practices, particularly for more effective implementation. In Asia during the past thirty years, programmes such as Farmer Field Schools and Community Integrated Pest Management have focused on increasing farmers’ ecological knowledge to equip them to improve their pest and disease management. Through these approaches farmers are more likely to make management decisions and tailor practices in response to their observations and understanding of ecological processes rather than to follow a prescriptive management package. This discussion paper describes some of the processes underlying the development of pest management practices in Southeast Asia and various stakeholders (including farmers, scientists, community, government) that influence this development.
Additional Notes This article has been extracted from Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts, Issue 2, June 2008
Description for Link Link to publisher hompage
URL http://www.cdu.edu.au/centres/spil/publications_ijlsc.html


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