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Considerations for the plant biosecurity policy interface: a case study of Indonesian policy authority and community exchange and plicy in Indonesia

Knight, Scott N. (2008). Considerations for the plant biosecurity policy interface: a case study of Indonesian policy authority and community exchange and plicy in Indonesia. Learning Communities: international journal of learning in social contexts,(2):138-155.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Considerations for the plant biosecurity policy interface: a case study of Indonesian policy authority and community exchange and plicy in Indonesia
Author Knight, Scott N.
Journal Name Learning Communities: international journal of learning in social contexts
Publication Date 2008
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1329-1440   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 138
End Page 155
Total Pages 18
Place of Publication Darwin, NT, Australia
Publisher Social Partnerships in Learning Research Consortium - Learning Research Group, Charles Darwin University
Field of Research 1301 - Education Systems
1303 - Specialist Studies in Education
1399 - Other Education
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract According to Sriro (2006), Indonesia’s public policy authority in law, resides with the position of President assisted directly by Coordinating Ministries which are themselves assisted by State Ministries in the planning and formulation of policy across portfolios. It is the State Ministries that act as the bureaucratic conduit through which government departments and non-government agencies operationalise national public policy, including that of plant biosecurity. Whilst the various governance levels of national, regional, provincial, municipal and regency legislative bodies have a role in the policy process this is primarily as law makers of regulations or interpreters of existing national policy for application within their respective jurisdictions. Notwithstanding this governance and policy construct, Indonesia as a fledgling democracy of ten years has demonstrated sensitivities which require community exchange with Executive government to mutually respond to localized public policy need and/or priority. This is demonstrable in special autonomy status being granted to Papua in 2004 and Aceh in 2006 and a partial regulatory amendment to Jakarta’s existing autonomy status to account for new development in the region. But how do community information exchanges occur, and how do community views become recognised in the Indonesian pubic policy process? The overarching question for this paper is: What constitutes an effective policy? The assumption underlying this question is that for policy to be effective, community must have an input into policy development, implementation and evaluation. This assumption has been developed through preliminary research conducted in a Balinese community during 2007. It is the latter research that is reported on in this paper.
Additional Notes This article has been extracted from Learning Communities: international journal of learning in social contexts, Issue 2, June 2008
Description for Link Link to published version
URL http://www.cdu.edu.au/centres/spil/publications_ijlsc.html


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