Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Large Waist but Low Body Mass Index: The Metabolic Syndrome in Australian Aboriginal Children

Sellers, E., Singh, Gurmeet and Sayers, Susan (2008). Large Waist but Low Body Mass Index: The Metabolic Syndrome in Australian Aboriginal Children. Journal of Pediatrics,153(2):222-227.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 10061xPUB16
Title Large Waist but Low Body Mass Index: The Metabolic Syndrome in Australian Aboriginal Children
Author Sellers, E.
Singh, Gurmeet
Sayers, Susan
Journal Name Journal of Pediatrics
Publication Date 2008
Volume Number 153
Issue Number 2
ISSN 0022-3476   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 222
End Page 227
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication US
Publisher Mosby, Inc.
Field of Research 1114 - Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Objective
To describe the prevalence and clinical characteristics of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a cohort of Australian Aboriginal children.

Study design
Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, skin fold thickness, body fat percentage, insulin resistance, and the prevalence of MetS were evaluated in 486 children age 9 to 14 years from the Darwin Health Region, Northern Territory, Australia.

Results
Using an age- and sex- specific definition, 14% of the children in the cohort had MetS, 6.4% were overweight, 4.9% were obese, and 26.2% had an elevated waist circumference. The mean percentage of body fat was 30.2%. The children with MetS had higher BMI and waist z-scores, percent body fat, Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) score, and skin fold thickness compared with those without MetS (P < .001); however, >50% of those with MetS were neither overweight nor obese. Waist circumference was significantly associated with insulin resistance as measured by the HOMA-IR (P < .001).

Conclusions
MetS is common in our cohort despite low rates of overweight and obesity. A tendency for central adiposity is already evident in these young children. Measurement of waist circumference may help identify Aboriginal children at high risk for MetS.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2008.02.006   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 377 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 12 May 2009, 16:05:01 CST by Sarena Wegener