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Riding out the storm: animal genetic resources policy options under climate change

Drucker, A.G., Hiemstra, S.J., Louwaars, N., Oldenbrook, J.K. and Tvedt, M.W. (2008). Riding out the storm: animal genetic resources policy options under climate change. In: Rowinson, P., Steele, M. and Nefzaoui, A. International Conference on Livestock and Global Climate Change, Hammamet, Tunisia, 17-20 May 2008.

Document type: Conference Paper
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID A00011xPUB2
Author Drucker, A.G.
Hiemstra, S.J.
Louwaars, N.
Oldenbrook, J.K.
Tvedt, M.W.
Title Riding out the storm: animal genetic resources policy options under climate change
Conference Name International Conference on Livestock and Global Climate Change
Conference Location Hammamet, Tunisia
Conference Dates 17-20 May 2008
Conference Publication Title Proceedings of the International Conference on Livestock and Global Climate Change
Editor Rowinson, P.
Steele, M.
Nefzaoui, A.
Place of Publication Cambridge, UK
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication Year 2008
ISBN 978-0-906562-62-8   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 81
End Page 84
Total Pages 4
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract In 2004, the IntergovernmentalTechnical Working Group on Animal Genetic Resources recommended 6 the FAO to commission a study to assess how exchange practices regarding AnGR affect the various stakeholders in the livestock sector, and to identify policies and regulatory options that guide the global exchange, use and conservation of AnGR. This paper presents the main climate change-related findings of that study by Hiemstra et al. (2006). A review of the literature related to the predicted impacts of climate change on livestock in 6 regions of the world (Anderson, 2004; AGO, 2004; ABS, 2004; CCCA, 2002 ; Charron, 2002; FAO, 2000 and undated; Frank et al., undated; MAFF, 2000; IPCC, 2001; Kenny, 2001; Kristjanson et al., 2001; Tisdell, 2003 and WRI, 2000) suggests that climate change can be expected to affect lives tock productivity directly by influencing the balance between heat dissipation and heat production (making heat/cold tolerance in breeds attractive), and indirectly through its effect on the availability of feed and fodder, as well as with regard to the presence of disease agents. However, global numbers hide complex spatial patterns of changes. The specific direction of change can only be predicted by considering specific localities. Regardless of the specific direction of change, these potential impacts suggest that the conservation of both productive and adaptive traits will become increasingly important. The importance of such conservation raises policy issues/concerns which in turn have particular policy implications associated with them. This allows a series of potential policy instruments that could be developed to address such issues to be identified, thereby supporting informed and evidence-based decision-making in international fora relevant to animal genetic resources (AnGR).
 
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Created: Wed, 13 May 2009, 13:34:03 CST by Sarena Wegener