Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Genetic consequences of landlocking in the common jollytail (Galaxias maculatus) from Victoria's Western District Lakes

Jacq, C and Austin, Christopher M. (2008). Genetic consequences of landlocking in the common jollytail (Galaxias maculatus) from Victoria's Western District Lakes. In: Bajhau, H, Phelan, M, Coutin, P and Grubert, M The Australian Society for Fish Biology Workshop, Darwin, 11-15 July 2005.

Document type: Conference Paper
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar

IRMA ID 83950043xPUB127
Author Jacq, C
Austin, Christopher M.
Title Genetic consequences of landlocking in the common jollytail (Galaxias maculatus) from Victoria's Western District Lakes
Conference Name The Australian Society for Fish Biology Workshop
Conference Location Darwin
Conference Dates 11-15 July 2005
Conference Publication Title A guide to monitoring fish stocks and aquatic ecosystems
Editor Bajhau, H
Phelan, M
Coutin, P
Grubert, M
Place of Publication Queenscliff, VIC
Publisher The Australian Society for Fish Biology
Publication Year 2008
ISBN 978-8-9804011-3-4   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 37
End Page 46
Total Pages 10
HERDC Category E2 - Conference Publication - Full written paper, non refereed proceedings (internal)
Abstract The common jollytail, Galaxias maculates, is a normally diadromous fish with a distribution spanning Australia, New Zealand, South America and associated islands. In this species, as in several other diadromous galaxiids, the marine larval stage is not obligatory and landlocking and landlocking often occurs as a consequence of the 'loss of diadromy'. Reproductive isolation accompanies landlocking of a population, and consequently facilities local adaption and the accumulation of genetic differences between populations. The Western District Lakes of Victoria (internationally recognised under the RAMSAR wetlands convention) are home to landlocked populations of G. maculatus. Present threats to G. maculatus in these lakes are habitat loss and/or degradation, predation from introduced salmonids, and translocation. Populations of landlocked and diadromous G. maculatus from western Victoria have been studied using molecular genetic methods to determine the extent of genetic differentiation between these two life-history forms.
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 69 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 15 May 2009, 11:10:58 CST by Sarena Wegener