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Building and practising a participatory monitoring and evaluation for Co-management of Protected Areas: a case study in Queensland, Australia

Izurieta, Arturo, Hockings, M., Ross, Guy, Rist, P. and Quincey, R. (2008). Building and practising a participatory monitoring and evaluation for Co-management of Protected Areas: a case study in Queensland, Australia. In: Garven, I. and Monk, S. Australian Protected Areas Congress 2008, Twin Waters, QLD, 24-28 November, 2008.

Document type: Conference Paper

IRMA ID 83950043xPUB129
Author Izurieta, Arturo
Hockings, M.
Ross, Guy
Rist, P.
Quincey, R.
Title Building and practising a participatory monitoring and evaluation for Co-management of Protected Areas: a case study in Queensland, Australia
Conference Name Australian Protected Areas Congress 2008
Conference Location Twin Waters, QLD
Conference Dates 24-28 November, 2008
Conference Publication Title APAC08 Proceedings - Australian Protected Areas Congress: Protected areas in the century of change
Editor Garven, I.
Monk, S.
Place of Publication Queensland
Publisher APAC
Publication Year 2008
Volume Number 1
ISBN 978-0-646-50733-0   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 165
End Page 167
Total Pages 3
HERDC Category E2 - Conference Publication - Full written paper, non refereed proceedings (internal)
Abstract Indigenous people’s aspirations in taking care of and managing country are expressed in practice in a physical presence of their people out on country. Agencies’ challenges in delivering appropriate management in areas where many Aboriginal people live, and their concern to improve Indigenous contribution to management, have opened common interests in co-management. A Co-management arrangement between Girringun Aboriginal Corporation (GAC) and Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) to run the Cardwell Indigenous Ranger Unit (CIRU) was used as a case study to examine whether a joint monitoring and evaluation (M&E) process, linked to an adaptive management approach, could strengthen the co-management arrangements. The M&E framework used to assess progress of the CIRU was developed jointly with the agency and Indigenous partners. Criteria related to decision making structures and processes, trust building, communication and operational performance have helped the parties to assess whether shared goals are being achieved, despite their differences in management approaches and perspectives. The six evaluation criteria and twenty eight indicators provided the parties with an ordered and methodical way to structure the evaluation process. The classification of the indicators according to the management effectiveness elements (context, planning, inputs, processes, outputs, and outcomes) provides a clearer understanding of where the emphasis in the evaluation is placed. The evaluation criteria illustrated an initial focus on consolidating shared visions and objectives, and in building their relationship and capacity to manage together. These were so important to the parties that they took precedence over the monitoring of on-ground outcomes. Joint assessments by QPWS and GAC carried out over in two consecutive years indicated a strong co-management arrangement with improving relationships and trust at the senior management level, while communication and information sharing at the operational level still needs to be strengthened.
 
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Created: Fri, 15 May 2009, 12:17:07 CST by Sarena Wegener