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Emotional Intelligence, Attachment Styles and Couple Relationship Satisfaction

Campbell, DE and Moore, KA (2003). Emotional Intelligence, Attachment Styles and Couple Relationship Satisfaction. In: Moore, KA 3rd Annual Conference of the Australian Psychology Society's Relationships Interest Group: Relationships : family, work and community, Melbourne, 15-16 November, 2003.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Campbell, DE
Moore, KA
Title Emotional Intelligence, Attachment Styles and Couple Relationship Satisfaction
Conference Name 3rd Annual Conference of the Australian Psychology Society's Relationships Interest Group: Relationships : family, work and community
Conference Location Melbourne
Conference Dates 15-16 November, 2003
Conference Publication Title Proceedings of the Australian Psychology Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group 3rd Annual Conference
Editor Moore, KA
Place of Publication Melbourne
Publisher The Australian Psychological Society, Inc.
Publication Year 2003
ISBN 9780909881245   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 14
End Page 19
Total Pages 6
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract This study examined links between emotional intelligence (EI), attachment styles and gender as part of a larger study into the relationship between EI and relationship satisfaction. Two hundred and forty-six participants (age range 18-79, M=36.41, SD=13.78) were recruited via media advertisements. They completed measures of EI and attachment style in addition to providing demographic information. A significant main effect was found for attachment style across all aspects of EI. For gender, a significant main effect was found only for the empathy aspect of EI. Further, significant effects were found for the interaction of gender and attachment on both the mood and empathy factors of EI. These differences are discussed in the context of attachment style theory.
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Nov 2009, 15:16:07 CST by Sarena Wegener