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Choosing the "cargo" for Noah's Ark - Applying Weitzman's approach to Borana cattle in East Africa

Zander, Kerstin K., Drucker, Adam G., Holm-Muller, K. and Simianer, H. (2009). Choosing the "cargo" for Noah's Ark - Applying Weitzman's approach to Borana cattle in East Africa. Ecological Economics,68(7):2051-2057.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 79763798xPUB8
Title Choosing the "cargo" for Noah's Ark - Applying Weitzman's approach to Borana cattle in East Africa
Author Zander, Kerstin K.
Drucker, Adam G.
Holm-Muller, K.
Simianer, H.
Journal Name Ecological Economics
Publication Date 2009
Volume Number 68
Issue Number 7
ISSN 0921-8009   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 2051
End Page 2057
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract If Noah had had the opportunity to select the animals he took on board his Ark, he would have had to choose between many species, breeds and types within breeds, all containing different genetic material. How could he have made the right choice and which would he have taken on board given the constraints he had to face? Those trying to save threatened livestock breeds within a tight conservation budget face similar questions. In this paper we assess how different types of Borana cattle, a culturally significant breed in East Africa, might be prioritized for conservation. By applying a cost-effectiveness analysis on the basis of Weitzman's approach we conclude that the highest priority should be given to the Ethiopian Borana type (EB) in Ethiopia. Noah, however, would also have been concerned about the problems of inbreeding and effective population size. To overcome this problem we suggest that, rather than loading just two animals, he should have loaded on board 1000 female and 100 male animals as a safe minimum. The minimum cost of conserving 1100 animals of the EB type with the participation of Ethiopian communities is calculated to be €7700 per year, mostly in the form of compensation payments to meet the opportunity costs of livestock-keepers that arise when maintaining the EB.
Keywords animal genetic resources
cost-effectiveness analysis
Ethiopia
Kenya
prioritisation for conservation
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2009.01.011   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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