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Preferences for continuing education through existing electronic access for Australian Nurse Practitioners and its implication in prescribing potential

Newman, C, Buckley, T, Dunn, Sandra and Cashin, A (2009). Preferences for continuing education through existing electronic access for Australian Nurse Practitioners and its implication in prescribing potential. Collegian,16(2):79-83.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 79764168xPUB22
Title Preferences for continuing education through existing electronic access for Australian Nurse Practitioners and its implication in prescribing potential
Author Newman, C
Buckley, T
Dunn, Sandra
Cashin, A
Journal Name Collegian
Publication Date 2009
Volume Number 16
Issue Number 2
ISSN 1322-7696   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-67349093569
Start Page 79
End Page 83
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication Netherlands, Australia
Publisher Elsevier BV
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Background
Little is known about Australian Nurse Practitioners (NPs) perceptions of the importance of continuing education (CE), their preferred methods to undertake CE in relation to prescribing practices or their access to electronic resources at work. Nurse Practitioner access to computerised technology may increase their provision of resources, provide point of care technology, and increase opportunities to participate in CE.

Purpose
This paper aims to explore Australian NP preferences for continuing education and NP access to electronic mediums that may increase CE opportunities.

Methods
A self-administered online survey was completed by 68 NPs from across Australia.

Results
The majority of respondents (93%) viewed CE to be very important and preferred methods of continuing education included receipt of information by email, and interactive online case studies. Respondents working in metropolitan areas had increased access to high speed Internet in comparison to NPs working in rural or remote areas, although this did not reach statistical significance (88% vs. 69%, p = 0.07). Significantly more NPs working in metropolitan areas had access to a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) than NPs working in rural or remote areas (44% vs. 6%, p = 0.003).

Conclusion
This is the first national survey to report preference for CE and access to technology of NPs in Australia. Electronic technology can provide programmed support such as online learning and resources through computers and PDAs to maximise NP prescribing potential.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colegn.2008.10.001   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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Created: Tue, 02 Mar 2010, 00:14:31 CST by Sarena Wegener