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"I'm not a man, I'm a graduate student": academic discourses and the construction of gender in higher education

Wolgemuth, Jennifer R. (2009). "I'm not a man, I'm a graduate student": academic discourses and the construction of gender in higher education. In: 32nd HERDSA Annual Conference, Darwin, 6-9 July 2009.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Wolgemuth, Jennifer R.
Title "I'm not a man, I'm a graduate student": academic discourses and the construction of gender in higher education
Conference Name 32nd HERDSA Annual Conference
Conference Location Darwin
Conference Dates 6-9 July 2009
Conference Publication Title The student experience: proceedings of the 32nd HERDSA Annual Conference
Place of Publication Milperra, NSW
Publisher Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australiasia, Inc
Publication Year 2009
Volume Number 32
ISBN 0908557787   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
ISSN 0155-6223   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 519
End Page 528
Total Pages 10
HERDC Category E1 - Conference Publication (DEST)
Abstract The academy has long been critiqued by feminists for privileging masculinity: as another institution in which gendered power is constructed and resisted. While graduate school is where new academics are socialized into their disciplines, gender is infrequently considered as part of the process of becoming an academic, especially from the perspective of male graduate students. This study examined the production of gender in the academy by analyzing the academic discourses (evolutionary psychology, humanist, social science, [pro]feminist and poststructural) four male graduate students took up in a series of conversations about gender in the academy. Findings revealed discourses were drawn upon to theorize the nature of the gender order, most discourses resulted in reification of a binary gender, and that, even for men who identified as ‘feminists,’ feminist discourses were not taken up to critique other academic discourses. Only the poststructural discourse challenged the naturalness of a binary gender and permitted a fluid and active construction of masculinity in higher education.
Implications for academic disciplines are discussed.


Additional Notes Research and Development in Higher Education Series
 
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Created: Thu, 18 Mar 2010, 13:27:38 CST by Sarena Wegener