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New reports of Australian cutaneous leishmaniasis in Northern Australian macropods

Dougall, Annette M., Shilton, C., LowChoy, Jodie, Alexander, B. and Walton, S. (2009). New reports of Australian cutaneous leishmaniasis in Northern Australian macropods. Epidemiology and Infection,137(10):1516-1520.

Document type: Journal Article
Citation counts: Altmetric Score Altmetric Score is 5
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Title New reports of Australian cutaneous leishmaniasis in Northern Australian macropods
Author Dougall, Annette M.
Shilton, C.
LowChoy, Jodie
Alexander, B.
Walton, S.
Journal Name Epidemiology and Infection
Publication Date 2009
Volume Number 137
Issue Number 10
ISSN 0950-2688   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 1516
End Page 1520
Total Pages 5
Place of Publication Cambridge, U.K
Publisher Cambridge University Press
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by various species of Leishmania is a significant zoonotic disease in many parts of the world. We describe the first cases of Australian cutaneous leishmaniasis in eight northern wallaroos, one black wallaroo and two agile wallabies from the Northern Territory of Australia. We describe the first Australian cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis in eight northern Wallaroos, one black wallaroo and two agile wallabies from the Northern Territory of Australia. Diagnosis was made through a combination of gross appearance of lesions, cytology, histology, direct culture, serology and a species-specific real-time PCR. Diagnosis was made through a combination of gross appearance of lesions, cytology, histology, direct culture, serology and a species-specific real-time PCR. The causative organism was found to be the same unique species of Leishmania previously identified in red kangaroos. The causative organism was found to be the same single species of Leishmania previously identified in red kangaroos. These clinical findings provide further evidence for the continuous transmission of the Australian Leishmania species and its presence highlights the importance of continued monitoring and research into the life-cycle of this parasite. These clinical findings provides further evidence for the continuous transmission of the Australian Leishmania species and its presence highlights the importance of continued monitoring and research into the life-cycle of this parasite.
Keywords Cutaneous leishmaniasis
diagnosis
macropods
Northern Territory
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268809002313   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)


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