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Equity served by the Growing Our Own Indigenous teacher education program: Keeping the plants watered

Maher, Marguerite (2009). Equity served by the Growing Our Own Indigenous teacher education program: Keeping the plants watered. In: Innovative, educate, celebrate: 4th Biennial Equity Conference 2009, Sydney, 10-11 September 2009.

Document type: Conference Paper
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Author Maher, Marguerite
Title Equity served by the Growing Our Own Indigenous teacher education program: Keeping the plants watered
Conference Name Innovative, educate, celebrate: 4th Biennial Equity Conference 2009
Conference Location Sydney
Conference Dates 10-11 September 2009
Conference Publication Title Innovative, educate, celebrate: 4th Biennial Equity Conference 2009
Publication Year 2009
HERDC Category E2 - Conference Publication - Full written paper, non refereed proceedings (internal)
Abstract This presentation reports theory to practice of equity in education on three levels within one program. First, it provides the theoretical underpinnings on which one Australian university builds its conceptualisation of equity through inclusion in education. These provided the momentum and impetus which has led to offering Initial Teacher Education (ITE) in situ to Indigenous Assistant Teachers (ATs) in remote Aboriginal communities. This Growing Our Own project is the first level of equity as ITE now includes those ATs for whom it would otherwise be unattainable. On a second level, the performance of Indigenous children in remote Indigenous schools is discussed and links are made to the imperative within the Growing Our Own program to equip graduates to bridge the divide between the cultural aspirations of Indigenous children and their parents in remote communities, and those of a largely Western curriculum offered in their schools. On a third level, the strong bonds that have formed between the university and the communities have led to increased numbers of mainstream ITE students completing professional experience in remote Indigenous schools. Increased understanding of Aboriginal ways of knowing, being and doing has enhanced preservice teachers’ capacity to meet the individual needs of Indigenous children in regular or mainstream classrooms where these children are frequently a minority group, marginalised on a number of fronts enhancing equitable accessing of education for these children. This presentation concludes with the reflections of these preservice teachers on their ability to work successfully with a range of diverse learners.
 
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Created: Mon, 22 Mar 2010, 13:49:20 CST by Sarena Wegener