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Why are non-photosynthetic tissues generally 13C enriched compared with leaves in C3 plants? Review and synthesis of current hypotheses

Cernusak, LA, Tcherkez, G, Keitel, C, Cornwell, WK, Santiago, LS, Knohl, A, Barbour, MM, Williams, DG, Reich, PB, Ellsworth, DS, Dawson, TE, Griffiths, HG, Farquhar, GD and Wright, IJ (2009). Why are non-photosynthetic tissues generally 13C enriched compared with leaves in C3 plants? Review and synthesis of current hypotheses. Functional Plant Biology,36(3):199-213.

Document type: Journal Article
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Title Why are non-photosynthetic tissues generally 13C enriched compared with leaves in C3 plants? Review and synthesis of current hypotheses
Author Cernusak, LA
Tcherkez, G
Keitel, C
Cornwell, WK
Santiago, LS
Knohl, A
Barbour, MM
Williams, DG
Reich, PB
Ellsworth, DS
Dawson, TE
Griffiths, HG
Farquhar, GD
Wright, IJ
Journal Name Functional Plant Biology
Publication Date 2009
Volume Number 36
Issue Number 3
ISSN 1445-4408   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Scopus ID 2-s2.0-62549128259
Start Page 199
End Page 213
Total Pages 15
Place of Publication Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Non-photosynthetic, or heterotrophic, tissues in C3 plants tend to be enriched in 13C compared with the leaves that supply them with photosynthate. This isotopic pattern has been observed for woody stems, roots, seeds and fruits, emerging leaves, and parasitic plants incapable of net CO2 fixation. Unlike in C3 plants, roots of herbaceous C4 plants are generally not 13C-enriched compared with leaves. We review six hypotheses aimed at explaining this isotopic pattern in C3 plants: (1) variation in biochemical composition of heterotrophic tissues compared with leaves; (2) seasonal separation of growth of leaves and heterotrophic tissues, with corresponding variation in photosynthetic discrimination against 13C; (3) differential use of day v. night sucrose between leaves and sink tissues, with day sucrose being relatively 13C-depleted and night sucrose 13C-enriched; (4) isotopic fractionation during dark respiration; (5) carbon fixation by PEP carboxylase; and (6) developmental variation in photosynthetic discrimination against 13C during leaf expansion. Although hypotheses (1) and (2) may contribute to the general pattern, they cannot explain all observations. Some evidence exists in support of hypotheses (3) through to (6), although for hypothesis (6) it is largely circumstantial. Hypothesis (3) provides a promising avenue for future research. Direct tests of these hypotheses should be carried out to provide insight into the mechanisms causing within-plant variation in carbon isotope composition.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/FP08216   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
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