Charles Darwin University

CDU eSpace
Institutional Repository

 
CDU Staff and Student only
 

Hunger and the perception of the scent of petrol: A potential neurobiological basis for increased risk of petrol inhalation abuse

Jackson, K., Currie, Bart J., Cairney, Sheree J., Maruff, P. and Snyder, P. (2009). Hunger and the perception of the scent of petrol: A potential neurobiological basis for increased risk of petrol inhalation abuse. Addiction Research and Theory,17(5):518-524.

Document type: Journal Article

IRMA ID 79260744xPUB1
Title Hunger and the perception of the scent of petrol: A potential neurobiological basis for increased risk of petrol inhalation abuse
Author Jackson, K.
Currie, Bart J.
Cairney, Sheree J.
Maruff, P.
Snyder, P.
Journal Name Addiction Research and Theory
Publication Date 2009
Volume Number 17
Issue Number 5
ISSN 1606-6359   (check CDU catalogue open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 518
End Page 524
Total Pages 7
Place of Publication UK
Publisher Informa Healthcare
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract The deliberate inhalation of petrol as a means of intoxication used by underage and marginalized social groups is a growing international problem. This type of abuse has been identified as the cause of severe physical, cognitive, and psychological impairment. Both of these factors have heightened the need for identifying causes underlying why individuals begin abusing petrol. One hundred Australian male adults were surveyed while they were filling their cars with petrol. While the individuals were exposed to ambient petrol, they were asked to rate how pleasant and intense they found the smell of the petrol and the number of hours since they last ate a meal. Significant positive correlations between hunger and ratings of both pleasantness and intensity of petrol odor were identified. The results from this study suggest that hunger, and more specifically saturated fat consumption, may influence an individual's decision to abuse petrol. Suggestions for further research and related public health considerations are discussed.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16066350802011656   (check subscription with CDU E-Gateway service for CDU Staff and Students  check subscription with CDU E-Gateway in new window)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 82 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 25 Mar 2010, 12:17:41 CST by Sarena Wegener