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Influenza Immunisation of Doctors at an Australian Tertiary Hospital: Immunisation Rate and Factors Contributing to Uptake

Kaufman, Jonathan, Davis, Joshua S. and Krause, Vicki (2008). Influenza Immunisation of Doctors at an Australian Tertiary Hospital: Immunisation Rate and Factors Contributing to Uptake. Communicable Diseases Intelligence,32(4):443-448.

Document type: Journal Article
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IRMA ID 75039815xPUB122
Title Influenza Immunisation of Doctors at an Australian Tertiary Hospital: Immunisation Rate and Factors Contributing to Uptake
Author Kaufman, Jonathan
Davis, Joshua S.
Krause, Vicki
Journal Name Communicable Diseases Intelligence
Publication Date 2008
Volume Number 32
Issue Number 4
ISSN 1447-4514   (check CDU catalogue  open catalogue search in new window)
Start Page 443
End Page 448
Total Pages 6
Place of Publication Canberra, ACT, Australia
Publisher Australian Government. Department of Health and Ageing. Office of Health Protection, Surveillance Branch
Field of Research 1103 - Clinical Sciences
1117 - Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Category C1 - Journal Article (DEST)
Abstract Immunisation of health care workers against influenza reduces influenza-related morbidity and mortality of hospital inpatients and staff absenteeism. Uptake of influenza vaccination amongst hospital doctors is generally inadequate, and factors contributing to influenza vaccine uptake among doctors have not been well defined. We performed an audit of doctors at an Australian hospital to establish the rate of and the factors contributing to influenza immunisation uptake. The audit was conducted by delivering a survey to doctors for self-completion at major departmental meetings. Of 243 doctors employed at the hospital, 150 completed the survey (response rate 62%), of whom only 28% received influenza immunisation in 2007 and 44% in any prior year. Doctors immunised in 2007 were of an older age (39.1 vs. 34.7 years, P=0.01) and level of seniority (odds ratio for consultant vs. more junior staff=2.9, P=0.02) than those not immunised. Doctors who had ever been immunised had a better knowledge about influenza than those never immunised (odds ratio for high knowledge score 4.2, P<0.001). The most common reasons cited for not being immunised in 2007 were being too busy, immunisation not being offered conveniently and not being aware how to access the vaccine. Immunisation rates among doctors in this study are inadequate. A perceived lack of convenience of the immunisation service and poor knowledge about influenza vaccination are the major contributing factors. Efforts to improve influenza immunisation uptake amongst hospital doctors should focus on education, and on innovative strategies to make immunisation more convenient and accessible specifically for doctors.
Keywords Influenza vaccine
Immunisation programs
Physicians
Hospital medical staff
Description for Link Link to published version
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URL http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/cda-cdi3204g.htm
https://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/Home


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